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Thursday, August 11, 2011

Yea, though we walk through the valley...

 
Way back in 2008, when I first read about horizontal hydrofracturing in the Marcellus Shale formation, I immediately knew that dark days lay ahead for the Susquehanna River, and in a larger sense, PA's environment as a whole.

I don't have the time or inclination to link back through the hundreds of posts I've written on this topic, but suffice it to say that most of what I've predicted has come to pass. I know you might think it's easy for me to say that...but other longtime bloggers are saying it as well.

In less than two weeks, an exceptional value stream in northeastern PA has been contaminated by three separate drilling mud spills...and the industry casually refers to the events as "inadvertent returns".

And their fix?  Reroute the stream...sorry, the exceptional value stream.

I wonder what will happen when they start drilling under the Susquehanna?

The dark days are here, folks. But the news of the day pales in comparison to what lies ahead.
  
     

1 comment:

  1. Don, everything you wrote here is true for me also. I found out about the invasion of the gas industry in 2008 when our family got an offer from Chesapeake Energy. The ensuing debate cost me my relationship with quite a few of my cousins- a sadness I feel still. I also could see right into the future at that time and knew PA was in big trouble.

    Re-routing a pristine stream? It sounds ridiculous. We are living in a bizarro world. In fact I believe the new Tennessee Pipeline is already being put in and goes under the Susquehanna at French Azilum near the old Rod and Gun Club site, right across from Homet's Ferry. I called the company and talked to a rep who told me the pipeline will be completed by the end of this year and will be put online in 2012. It is a 30-inch pipe which will go in right next to the old one (installed in 1955-6). Both pipelines will be used. He told me the pipeline is put in about 4-6 feet below the ground. What are the chances that everything will go well?

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